Skip to main content

About your Search

20121126
20121126
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2
that happens. i next caller in anaheim, california. caller: >> the first part of my question, i have two daughters currently attending private school. i this move them from a public school. my cost is approximately $30 per student day -- there were two teachers, it was a well-known program, private instruction, the average class size was 10 students. more days per school year than the public school, and so forth -- now they're getting older and i am moving them into the public school system. i got a note that said, if your children are absent or are not there during the course of the year for a given day, the school does not receive money for the days they are not there -- we were hoping we would make a country should recover their costs of $40 a student day. how is it that at a public level where they have a fraction of the number of days of instruction per year and hours per day are shorter, they are asking for $40 per student day where they were getting a better quality of education at $30 a student day at a private level? how is it in a state like california where we are going broke
in pleasanton, california. hi there. caller: i got through after months of trying. host: glad you made it. caller: me, too. i was about to give up. anyhow, i think the federal government makes a guarantee in all these loans they have been doing. when they do that, the banks, the loners, do not have to worry about it. it is the same thing with public employee pension funds. they're claiming that they're getting 7.5%. so when they lose money, they ask the public to repay them money for their pension, and i do not think that is right. that has got to stop. the other thing is, the housing market was going crazy because people were buying homes and reselling them at greater profit, and they were bragging about all of this. host: ok, let's go to nick timiraos and get a response. guest: it is a very common view. people on both sides of the aisle often say we like to see the government not play this role bang in the housing market. some say the government should play no role b. if you look at the history of federal involvement in the mortgage market, it goes back to the depression, and we really
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2